Dec 8 2015

BBQ 101 classes return!

Our BBQ cooking classes are back!  The first one of 2016 will take place on Sunday January 17th from 12pm-5pm at Wiley’s Championship BBQ in our newly expanded dining room.  Looking for a gift for that hard to shop for person or food enthusiast on your list?  Give the gift of championship BBQ! Purchase one of the very limited spots in our BBQ class! The cost is $150 per person, or $250 per couple.  Did we mention space is VERY limited?  Register today before the class fills up!  Wondering what in the heck a BBQ cooking class is like?  Click here to read a review written by Hope Philbrick of Columbia County Magazine who took one of our classes and wrote an article about it! You can also watch a video clip from a previous BBQ class here.

 


Jan 20 2014

Pre-Order our book on Amazon and Barnes and Noble!

You can pre-order Wiley’s Championship BBQ Cookbook on Amazon and Barnes & Noble’s websites!

Wiley's Championship BBQ Cookbook
Pre-Order On Amazon
Wiley’s Championship Barbecue: Secrets Old Men Take to the Grave

-or-

Pre-Order On B&N
Wiley’s Championship Barbecue: Secrets Old Men Take to the Grave


Sep 17 2007

Green Beans

If you stay in the catering business long enough, you get some really different gigs/jobs. We experienced this phenomenon this past weekend when we catered a party in Port Wentworth for a regional conference of The Little People of America. As different as we imagined it to be, it was probably one of the better parties (most fun) we have catered in our whole career. They had a talent show, a DJ, dancing and… even though their stature is small, they have large appetites! It was really a fun party to do!

In the last couple of years, we have started adding green beans to the menu. The General despises canned green beans because they taste canned, so I have been buying the frozen 5 pound long cut package at Sam’s. They are very easy to prepare. Simply bring your water to a boil (TG uses the turkey fryer pot) and add the green beans…for this party I used 15 pounds. This will cool the water, so wait until the water comes back to a boil. In the meantime, add a handful of minced garlic along with 1/3 cup of Lea and Perrin’s Worchestershire sauce. Once the water returns to boiling, cook for no more than 5 minutes. Do not over boil them!! Remove the beans from the pot and put them in half pans and add plenty of butter. As Paula Deen says, “The more butter, the better they taste.” These beans retain a nice green color and have plenty of texture and flavor…and have really been a hit at the parties where we serve them.


Aug 29 2007

A Neat "Hat Trick"

No, The General has not taken up ice hockey! Let’s face it cooking…especially BBQ…can be a messy pastime. Over the years TG has collected hats from all over the country. All are valuable in the memories they provide, but most of my favorites had become too dirty to wear. I originally thought taking them to the dry cleaners may work…but that is pretty expensive. Here is an almost cost free way to get your hats clean…put them on the top rack of the dishwasher and hit the on button. Yes, you can have dishes on the bottom rack. When the cycle is complete, take the hat out and stuff a towel in the crown to retain its shape. Let it air dry and you are finished. I have done almost a dozen hats this way and even the worst ones have come out looking as good as new!


Jan 2 2007

Just Under the Wire

Last year TLW told me I could not blog about turkeys except during the holiday season. So, I want to slip this one in before I get out of season again…for my own reference as well as our readers.


As already noted in November TG cooked 148 turkeys for the Old Savannah City Mission to serve in Forsyth Park. What we found living here in Savannah is that Savannahians use a simple mixture of black pepper and seasoned salt all blended together for their rub for both turkey and pork…and who knows what else. TG got lucky at Sam’s recently and found a product I hadn’t seen before and that is Rosemary and Garlic seasoning. I used it as part of my rub on the turkeys I sold to customers. The rosemary and garlic put off a wonderful aroma as the meat cooks. In the absence of fresh whole rosemary, I put bay leaves in the cavity. I also combined the Rosemary and Garlic Seasoning by Tone’s with another product of theirs which is Sea Salt and Parsley.


Our old faithful is Morton’s Tender Quick which I have been using for years to brine my turkeys. This product is sold often times in hardware stores of all places. Since this is not always found on your local grocery store’s shelves, I would suggest if you have trouble finding it to just
order it online. They also have a 32 page illustrated guide to curing meat, so you might want to inquire about that also. Remember always cook your turkey to 170* in the thickest part of the bird.


We also have found recipes on the internet for different brines. This is fun way to experiment for all The General’s chemistry buddies.


This wraps up my turkey discussion until the holiday season of 2007.

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Brining in a heavy duty bag is a great space saver. Just remember to ‘flip the bird’ often!

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Hot and ready to be delivered.


Nov 22 2006

Turkey Hotline

Turkey How To’s

Turkey Hotline 1-800-Butterball

Have a great Thanksgiving Day!


Sep 11 2006

5 Things To Eat Before You Die

The General got tagged by Bigmista over at The Survival Gourmet to participate in the latest meme, Foodbloggers Guide to the Globe. The premise is that food bloggers from all over the world should list five things that they have eaten and think everyone should try at least once before they die. TLW and I have put our heads together and have come up with our list!

1. TLW’s ultimate pick is an authentic Lobster bake…she says forget the fillers (corn, potatoes and sausage) and stick with the fresh steamed lobster and soft shell clams or “steamers” as she calls them. She remembers times on Nantucket and Cape Cod when a large hole would be dug in the beach and a fire was started in it. Then rocks would be thrown on the fire along with seaweed. Then all the food was thrown on top of the seaweed, covered by another layer of seaweed and then a tarp. This way everything steamed with the wonderful aroma of the sea…..



Lobsterdinner Resized3



2. Salmon: If you have never enjoyed or had the pleasure of eating wild salmon it is 180* different from farm raised. It just doesn’t get much better than Alaska’s Copper River Salmon. Use this 50 year old
recipe for a 30 minute marinade. The best!


3. Beef brisket cooked correctly is the best BBQ you can eat…although most folks like pork. Make this “brisket rollup” by using either blue cheese or ranch dressing, green and yellow peppers sauteed, mushrooms and onions sauteed, and thin sliced 7″ flat bread along with brisket slices.


4. Cuban sandwich includes roast pork, ham, yellow mustard, Swiss cheese, and bread and butter pickles. Use Cuban bread with melted butter on top. Press the sandwich on a sandwich press or under a foil covered brick.


5. Bread pudding with Easy Bourbon Sauce



1 3/4 C sugar

4 eggs

1 1/2 t vanilla (pure)

1 1/2 t cinnamon

1 1/2 t nutmeg

3/4 C butter (melted)

1 C whole milk

1 C heavy cream

1/2 C raisins

1/3 C pecans

6 C bread (stale French) diced


Into large blender jar, add eggs and blend on medium speed 30-45 seconds or until eggs are lemon yellow color. Add sugar, vanilla, nutmeg, cinnamon, butter and blend on medium speed until thoroughly blended. Add milk and cream and mix. Fold in raisins and pecans.


Into large bowl add diced bread, along with egg and milk mixture. Fold until bread is completely soaked with egg and milk mixture.


Pour mixture into thoroughly greased cooking pan. Place in preheated oven at 325* and bake for 35-40 minutes. Increase oven temperature to 425* and cook until well browned…about 15 minutes.


Bourbon Sauce

1 stick of unsalted butter at room temperature

1 C sugar

1/4 C water

1 large egg yolk

2 T bourbon


Combine all ingredients except bourbon in small saucepan. Mix well. Cook over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat and continue cooking…about 3 minutes or until the mixture starts to thicken. Remove from heat and stir in bourbon.


Sep 9 2006

Pork Brine and a Little Rest

If you have ever competed in a competitive sport, like golf or tennis, you know how important it is to try to “keep it all together.” It is sometimes quite a feat! For instance, in golf you may get your putting game down, but then all of a sudden your fairway shots seem to fall off. In tennis, your backhand might be killer, but your volleys never land where you want them to.


Such is the case in cooking competitive BBQ. The General has been
whining bemoaning about not winning the Georgia State Championship last month by less than two points. After considerable agonizing, it seems as though our pork was a little off. Sometimes it is the simplest of things that might cause your product to go askew. I was reading the July/August edition of Cook’s Illustrated and they had an article on Cuban BBQ Pork. In the article it stated that you should always allow your finished pork butt to rest for at least 30 minutes to an hour to allow the juices to re-distribute through the meat.


All of a sudden, a bell went off in my head! Why have I been taking my pork straight from the pit and pulling it…not allowing the juices to re-distribute? TG knows better than this! Could this be my missing secret?


In the same article, they gave a recipe for pork brine that I think may be worth trying:


3 C sugar

2 C table salt

2 medium garlic heads, separated and crushed

4 C orange juice


Dissolve the sugar and salt in six cups of cold water in a stock pot. Stir in the garlic and orange juice. Submerge pork in brine and refrigerate eighteen to twenty-four hours. **Be sure to rinse off the brine before smoking due to the high content of salt and sugar.


Perhaps I can fix my pork?


This backs up the case that TG argues repeatedly (and doesn’t always follow)…keep strict notes because when things start to go wrong you can always refer back to your notes!


Aug 27 2006

Slight deviation

TG has always sprayed meat with 1 part apple cider vinegar, 2 parts apple juice, and enough Lea & Perrins to turn the mixture dark. One of our fellow competitors on the BBQ circuit uses a mixture of 2 parts apple juice, 1 part Jack Daniels and 1 part maple syrup. I will be trying this on my beef, pork butt and chicken next week…stay tuned!

And check out this week’s Carnival of the Recipes at The Common Room…good stuff!


Aug 27 2006

Bingo!

Since we have been here in Savannah, we have been for the most part cut off from buying CAB (Certified Angus Beef) brisket. Wow! It does make a difference. Out of desperation, I asked Donald, the butcher, at the local Piggly Wiggly supermarket if he could get some. He called back a week later to let me know my CAB brisket had arrived and were they ever nice!


TG prepped the brisket by removing any excess fat, but still leaving plenty of fat on for flavor. I seasoned it with Happy Holla’ seasoning and some garlic black pepper. The pit was loaded about 10:30 pm and I had set it to cook low and slow all night. The next morning when I checked the temperature, the probe slid right through the meat with no resistance. I knew right then that we had some superb brisket! Most people would say, “Right on!” The brisket was cut across the grain in 1/4″ slices and each piece was brushed with bbq sauce mixed with some honey.


Too bad we weren’t competing…these briskets would have easily scored in the top ten!


Sometimes the simple things in life are by far the best. Using the fabulous brisket, we made sandwiches. I had read somewhere that one of our fellow bbq’ers at his restaurant always topped his brisket sandwiches with french fried onion rings and some bbq sauce. What a hit!


When we were closing up for the day, a fisherman who had had a little too much to drink, came up to me and started talking about his sandwich…saying it was the best sandwich he had ever had. I hope he remembers the brisket as much as he remembers the onion ring! TLW says he will probably spend the rest of his life craving that sandwich!


I wish I had my ‘camera person’ with me!!